Untitled-1 1

Advertisements

Honeycomb hexagons

Honeycombs are actively built by bees, the bees could make just about any shape but over a long period of natural selection their behavior evolved to make shapes that minimize the area of wax needed and still be structurally functional for their needs. Perhaps the same structural principles could be used when trying to improve concrete casting and reducing the amount of material needed to make a variety of concrete shapes.

Image source: https://www.quora.com/Why-does-nature-prefer-hexagonal-shapes

Meandering river

Amazon river

Process: erosion

Meanders are sinuous bends in a river with a faster flow of water on the outside channel leaving the inside to be slower therefore depositing sediments. The water flows faster on the outside bend of a river because it has further to travel, its speed and erosive power is therefore greater. This erodes the outside of the meander, producing a river cliff and deeper channel on that side. The bends become deeper and deeper in time, until the water finds a shortcut and the bends are cut off, drying out or becomes separate lakes.

Image source: https://sites.google.com/site/stmarysfluvialstudies/meanders-alice-emily

P_WALL

Image Source: http://matsysdesign.com/2011/09/17/p_wall-sevenstar/ Credits: Fabrication and Installation: Andrei Hakovich, Sean Wong, and Nathan John Date: 2011 Materials: Fiber-Reinforced Plaster Fabrication process: Using nylon fabric and wooden dowels as form-work, the weight of the liquid plaster slurry causes the fabric to sag, expand, and wrinkle before finding a state of equilibrium. The form that emerges resonates […]

Image Source:

http://matsysdesign.com/2011/09/17/p_wall-sevenstar/

Credits:

Fabrication and Installation: Andrei Hakovich, Sean Wong, and Nathan John

Date: 2011

Materials: Fiber-Reinforced Plaster

Fabrication process:

Using nylon fabric and wooden dowels as form-work, the weight of the liquid plaster slurry causes the fabric to sag, expand, and wrinkle before finding a state of equilibrium. The form that emerges resonates with the tension between our own elastic skin and fluid interior.

What really interests me is the way they shape the casting. Using the self-organization of material under force to shape it. It is similar to the tension between our own skin and fluid interior. This really makes the casting like an alive biology. Maybe it can even breathe through the holes on it, just like cells of human beings.

Slip forming

This is a technique for casting high towers without using scaffolding. As the concrete dries, the same form slides upwards and is used again, adding layer by layer. Maybe a similar concept can be used in a smaller scale somehow?

Image source: https://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glidformsgjutning
Material: Concrete
Process: Slip forming

Injection moulding

This is how most of the world’s plastic products are made, from car body panels to bottle lids. It is also used for glass and metals. The material is heated and forced into a cavity mould made of metal, where it cools and hardens. The moulds can be reused thousands of times which makes it ideal for mass production. The picture is showing one side of a comb mould.

Image source: https://sc02.alicdn.com/kf/HTB14sGpJXXXXXX0XFXXq6xXFXXXh/China-Factory-Plastic-Comb-Making-Injection-Mold.jpg
Material: plastic
Process: injection moulding

Dune

Made by: Rainer Mutsch

Material: Fiber cement

Process: Produced by the company Eternit fiber-cement is a very durable, fully recyclable material consisting of 100% natural materials like cellulose fibers and water.

Each Dune element is 3D-molded out of one whole fiber-cement panel, the cut-offs are thereby reduced to a minimum.

dzn_dune-by-rainer-mutsch2

rainer-mutsch-1

Image source: https://www.dezeen.com/2010/10/27/dune-by-rainer-mutsch/